He Says, She Says…

Hello, Dear Reader:

Welcome to our He Says, She Says post!

Both of us have been undergoing some interesting transformations of late, and this generated some discussion between us late last night.  A part of that was an idea that arose yesterday afternoon, and so we thought we’d address that today.  If you’ve read our He Says, She Says… posts before, you’ll know that we choose a topic together but neither of us reads the other’s post until we’ve both written what we have to say.  This way we don’t influence each other’s thought processes.

So, without further ado, this week we’re going to explore our ideas on ‘The Sandbox’.

Have a great week!

Hugs,
M&M

Follow these links to read what He Says/She Says: Marcia’s View / Mike’s View

He Says, She Says…

Hello, Dear Reader:

Serendipity is a word that defines what some call a ‘happy accident’ or an unexpected and fortunate discovery.  It’s an onomatopoeic word, and has a lovely sound to it. It’s right up there with some of our other favourite ‘S’ words, like spontaneity and synchronicity.

Serendipity is also the title of a 2001 movie, a romantic comedy starring John Cusack and Kate Beckinsale.  It was on TV again recently and remains one of our ‘love to watch’ movies.

If you haven’t seen it we don’t want to spoil it for you, so we’ll put a ‘Spoiler Alert!‘ in here.  If you’d rather not know, skip down a couple of paragraphs. Continue Reading →

He Says, She Says…

Hello, Dear Reader!

Who are we, really, and what it is that makes us who we are?  Are we the products of our past, the progenitors of our future, or are we simply who we are, in this moment?  If we desire to change something in our lives, do we need to free ourselves from our memories, or do we simply make the changes we would wish, in this moment?  Eleanor Roosevelt said:

“It is today we must create the world of the future.”

With that in mind, we thought we’d tackle these ideas in this week’s He Says, She Says post, “Then and Now”.

“There is nothing for you to go back and live over, or fix, or feel regret about now. Every part of your life has unfolded just right. And so — now — knowing all that you know from where you now stand, now what do you want? The answers are now coming forth to you. Go forth in joy, and get on with it.” ~ Abraham-Hicks

Have a great week!

Hugs,
M&M

Follow these links to read what He Says/She Says: Marcia’s View / Mike’s View.

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P.S.  As often happens, our friend Samantha recently published a blog post on a similar subject (with her own unique perspective), entitled, “Lighten Up“.

He Says, She Says…

Hello, Dear Reader!

Well, as we mentioned last Sunday, our new grandson made his way into the world a little over a week ago.  He has an older sibling so this is our second grandchild, but we also have a great-nephew.  His mother is Mike’s niece, but she’s more like a daughter to him.  That got us thinking about family and what it means to be a family, so that’s the topic for our post this week.

Have a great week!

Hugs,
M&M (Grandy and Gandalf – Have you seen our picture?)

Follow these links to read what He Says/She Says: Marcia’s View / Mike’s View.

He Says, She Says…

Greetings, Dear Reader!

Thanks so much for stopping by!!

If you’ve read these posts before, you’ll know that every Sunday Marcia and Mike pick a common topic and write about it individually.  Neither reads the other’s posts until both are finished.  The title for this week’s talk, ‘The Elephant in the Room‘, comes from a post written by journalist Robert Scoble during his time at the 2010 TED Conference in Long Beach, CA.  You can read his article here: The elephants in the room at TED.  The ‘elephant’ in this case is money.  Those having taken a vow of poverty aside, money is often among the most challenging of ideas held by many if not most people.   It doesn’t matter if you are a street person, a corporate executive or a subsistence farmer, or whether the currency is dollars, pounds, rubles, kroner, baht, pesos, rand or yen.  Both Marcia and Mike have been included in this, at least at times.

The title of this week’s post came from Robert Scoble, but the inspiration for this week’s post came from our wise and wondrous friend, Samantha Standish and a series of blog posts she has written recently on her ‘I Am Pollyana‘ blog.  Our thanks to her and to the many, many people who have been and continue to be our guides, our teachers and our friends.

Hugs,
M&M

Follow these links to read what He Says/She Says: Marcia’s View / Mike’s View.

He Says, She Says…

Greetings:

Our topic for this week comes from a quote in a book that both Marcia and Mike have recently read.  The book is titled, ‘The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid‘, by Bill Bryson.  On page 10 of the book, he wrote:

“The two teams split the first two games, so it came down to a third, deciding game.  At last the Dodgers appeared to recover their invincibility, taking a comfortable 4 to 1 lead into the ninth inning and needing just three outs to win.  But the Giants scored a late run and put two more runners aboard when Bobby Thomson stepped to the plate.  What Thomson did that afternoon in the gathering dusk of autumn has many times been voted the greatest moment in baseball history.

“Dodger reliever Ralph Branca threw a pitch that made history yesterday,” one of those present wrote.  “Unfortunately it made history for someone else.  Bobby Thomson, the ‘Flying Scotsman’ swatted Branca’s second offering over the left field wall for a game-winning home run so momentous, so startling, that it was greeted with a moment’s stunned silence.

“Then, when the realization of the miracle came, the double-decked stands of the Polo Grounds rocked on their forty-year-old foundations.  The Giants had won the pennant, completing one of the unlikeliest comebacks baseball has ever seen.”

The author of those words was my father – who was abruptly, unexpectedly, present for Thomson’s moment of magesty.  Goodness knows how he had talked the notoriously frugal management of the Register into sending him the 1,132 miles from Des Moines to New York for the crucial deciding game – an act of rash expenditure radically out of keeping with decades of careful precedent – or how he had managed to secure credentials and a place in the press box at such a late hour.

But then he had to be there.  It was part of his fate, too.  I am not exactly suggesting that Bobby Thomson hit that home run because my father was there or implying that he wouldn’t have hit it if my father had not been there.  All I am saying is that my father was there and Bobby Thomson was there and the home run was hit and these things could not have been otherwise.”

So, what then guides the dictates of our lives?  Is it fate?  Is it a Guiding Hand or some supernatural force?  Or are our lives the summaries of our choices?  For this week’s ‘He Says, She Says’ post we thought we’d take on “Destiny or Choice: A Matter of Beliefs?”

Follow these links to read what He Says/She Says: Marcia’s View / Mike’s View

He Says, She Says…

We have been thoroughly enjoying the process and unfolding of this blog site these past two months of 2009.  And so, with great excitement, we are looking forward to the growth, the potential and the inspirational development of ourselves (both individually and as a couple) as well as that of our blog site through 2010. It will be fun to have you journey along with us!

With that in mind, we thought we’d share our thoughts on the ‘New Year

Follow these links to read what He Says/She Says: Marcia’s View / Mike’s View

He Says, She Says…

Hi Folks:

Andy Williams wrote:

“It’s the most wonderful time of the year
With the kids jingle belling
And everyone telling you “Be of good cheer”
It’s the most wonderful time of the year
It’s the hap-happiest season of all
With those holiday greetings and gay happy meetings
When friends come to call
It’s the hap- happiest season of all…”

This time of year is a special one for many people.  It can also be a time of sadness and challenges.

Keeping that in mind, we thought we’d share our thoughts on ‘Christmas…’

Follow these links to read what He Says/She Says: Marcia’s View / Mike’s View

He Says, She Says…

Hi Folks:

This week’s ‘He Says, She Says’ was inspired by the following quote from Abraham.

“Just let go of the incessant description of where you are, and start telling the story differently. Start telling a story that feels more downstream to you. And how do you know what’s downstream and what’s upstream? You can tell by the pressure against you.” … Abraham-Hicks

Keeping that in mind, we thought we’d share our thoughts on ‘The Stories I Tell Myself…’

Follow these links to read what He Says/She Says: Marcia’s View / Mike’s View

He Says, She Says…

She Says…

The month of November introduced much that was new into my – our – life. I took on the challenge of, and exceeded, my own expectations with Nanowrimo (http://nanowrimo.org) writing a 52, 885 word novel in a mere 28 days.

During this same time, Mike and I opened up our personal writings to the blogging world through https://www.wolfnowl.com

As a result of the emergence of our skills and talents to the public at large, if you will, the topic of copyright surfaced in our conversations. We, Mike and I, have differing views on the subject. It is because of this difference that we chose to tackle the subject through this newest blog idea: 

He Says/She Says.

Please come back each Sunday to read up on whatever topic might have triggered our latest discussions during a given week. Sometimes we’ll have similar views. Other times…well, we’ll let you decide!

In Light & Laughter, Marcia

He Says…

Since everyone has their own perceptions of, well, everything, we thought that once a week we’d post our views on the same topic – two different points of view on the same subject.  I thought I’d start with:

The Perception Wheel

Our first understandings of the perception wheel came from the book ‘Seven Arrows‘ by Hyemeyohsts Storm.  A shortened version of the story is here:

Imagine a circle with four people around it.  We’ll call them A, B, C, D but you may substitute any four names you like.  In the middle of this circle we’ll place an arrow.

Perception WheelNow person A looks at this arrow and, being a reasonably intelligent person, thinks to himself, “That arrow is coming toward me.”  Person B looks at that arrow and, being a reasonably intelligent person, thinks to herself, “That arrow is going from left to right.”  Person C looks at that arrow and, being a reasonably intelligent person, thinks to himself, “That arrow is going away from me.”  And person D looks at that arrow and, being a reasonably intelligent person, thinks to herself, “That arrow is going from right to left.”  But they’re all looking at the same arrow.  Now if we remove the arrow and replace it with an idea, a concept, a Way of being, an understanding, a religion or a government, and if, instead of four people we have a thousand or six billion, we can see that everyone will see things from their own unique perspective.

There are two ways to deal with this.  The first is to say, “Well, this is my circle and my arrow and you have to see the arrow the way I do or I’m going to take my arrow and go home.”  That’s possible, happens all the time, but it’s also very limiting in terms of what can be learned from it.  The other way is to say, “Well, I don’t see the arrow that way, but I understand that you do.  Perhaps if we work together we can reach a new understanding that is common to both or all of us.”  Understanding the perception wheel is the foundation for teaching and for sharing.

Mike.

Follow these links to read what He Says/She Says on Copyright: Marcia’s View / Mike’s View

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December 26, 2009
Update: Read Seth Godin’s view, here.

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