He Says, She Says… How to Be Santa Claus

Hello, Dear Reader:

Being Christmas eve and all, it seemed like an appropriate topic for today.  This ‘He Says, She Says…‘ post is going to be primarily a ‘He Says’, and it’s likely to be our last blog post of 2010, so I’ll add in a greeting from Marcia as well:  However you celebrate it, we wish a joyous Holiday season to you and to those near and dear to your heart.

When you look like me, a lot of kids call you Santa Claus.  I’m also very fortunate to have my own Mrs. Claus.  Being called Santa may be partly because of the white hair and beard, but I still remember one day over 15 years ago when I was standing at an ATM outside (in July) wearing a headband, sunglasses, denim jacket and jeans, and a girl passing by called out, “Look mom, it’s Santa Claus!” “No, I don’t think so.” was the reply.  “Yeah, it is!”  Mom was thinking ‘Hells Angels’ was more likely, but the little girl could see through the disguise.  I also remember the first time a little one, too young to talk, walked by with his dad in hand.  As they walked away the little one began saying, “Ho Ho Ho.  Ho Ho Ho…”  His dad didn’t know what he was going on about, but we did.

However, this isn’t a post about how to look like Santa Claus, it’s about how to be Santa Claus, no matter what you look like.  And that’s something anyone can do, no matter your faith or beliefs.  The ‘father’ of the modern day Santa Claus was St. Nicholas, a Grecian man who lived in Lycia in the 4th century.  Born to wealthy parents, they died when he was young and he was raised by his uncle.  As he grew up St. Nick was a pious man, and very generous with what he had.  He also encouraged his associates to be generous as well.  There are a number of stories about his life; this is one of my favourites… Continue Reading →

He Says, She Says… the True Nature of a Gift?

Hello, Dear Reader:

Well, we’re back from our self-imposed hiatus from ‘He Says, She Says…‘ posts; we’re awaiting the proof copy of Marcia’s new book from the printer.  Last night we were going through previous posts to determine what we’ve covered and realized that this is our 30th post in this category!

Every morning before we get out of bed we take a moment to ask each other about remembered dreams from the night before, and often one or the other of us will have a sequence to share or sometimes an idea or a thought that arose out of our nightly wanderings.  Here’s an example from a week ago: “Old fears make perfect soil in which to plant new dreams.”  This morning Mike awoke with the thought: “Understand the true nature of a gift.”  It reminded us of a blog post done by Seth Godin a couple of weeks ago titled, “Gifts, misunderstood.”  It’s well worth reading, in our opinion, as are all of Seth’s posts.  In his post Seth mentions O. Henry’s book ‘The Gift of the Magi‘, a Christmas story.  Although unmentioned, the movie ‘Pay it Forward‘ would also fit into this genre of gifting.

So, with that in mind we thought we’d make the topic of this week’s He Says, She Says… post, “The True Nature of a Gift?”

Hugs,
M&M

Follow these links to read what He Says/She Says: Marcia’s View / Mike’s View

Telling Tales – The Walk is Part of the Gift

Hi Folks:  As a writer and a storyteller, I collect stories the way others might collect stamps or record albums or…  I collect them because they give me pleasure, and because it gives me pleasure to share them with others.  Wherever I can I give credit to the person or people who authored a given story, but sometimes one comes across a story that is listed simply as ‘Author Unknown’.  The following stort story is one of those.  So to whomever authored this story, my gratitude!

Mike.

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An old Cree woman decided one day to present a priest she knew and loved with a sample of her embroidery.  She left the house early, and began her journey to the town far away.  The ground was hard and her feet were sore, but she continued on her quest.

As the day progressed, the sun beat down on her and baked her skin.  The stones on the path cut her feet, and by the time she arrived at her destination, she was exhausted, her lips were cracked, and her feet were bleeding.  Nonetheless, when the priest answered the door she held her embroidery up with great pride.

The priest’s eyes were filled with tears as he took the delicate embroidery from her hands, but his gaze was filled with the question ‘Why?’.

Looking up at him, the woman said, “Father, you don’t understand.  The walk is part of the gift.”

Author Unknown.